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How Many Scoville Units Is Taco Bell Sauce

How Many Scoville Units Is Taco Bell Sauce? Answered

Last Updated on July 16, 2024 by Shari Mason

For **fast food lovers**, Taco Bell’s sauces are a real hit. **Mild sauce** adds a creamy, tasty kick, and **Diablo sauce** turns up the heat. These exciting flavors bring joy to everyone’s taste buds.

However, the question remains for those who love a good kick of heat: how spicy is Taco Bell sauce? Specifically, many people wonder how many Scoville units is the Taco Bell sauce. 

Scoville units measure the heat level of chili peppers, so knowing this information can help you determine which sauce to choose for your desired level of spiciness.

How Many Scoville Units Are In Taco Bell’s Mild Sauce?

COPYCAT TACO BELL MILD SAUCE ON A GLASS BOWL

While the exact number of Scoville units in Taco Bell’s Mild sauce is not publicly available, it is generally considered 500-1,000 SHU. 

This puts it at a relatively mild spiciness level, similar to bell or banana pepper [1]. Mild sauce is famous for those who enjoy a little heat but prefer to keep it milder. 

It’s an excellent option for those new to spicy foods or wanting to add a touch of flavor without overwhelming their taste buds.

Read:

What Are Scoville Units & How Are They Used To Measure Spiciness?

Scoville units measure the pungency, or spiciness, of chili peppers and other spicy foods.

They were named after American pharmacist Wilbur Scoville, who developed the Scoville Organoleptic Test in 1912 to measure the heat level of chili peppers. 

The test involves diluting a chili pepper extract in sugar water and having a panel of tasters taste the solution until they can no longer detect the heat.

The number of dilutions needed to reach this point determines the pepper’s Scoville rating. 

Today, Scoville units are commonly used to indicate the heat level of hot sauces, salsas, and other spicy foods. The higher the number of Scoville units [2], the hotter the food is perceived.

But what’s the Scoville unit in the Takis Fuego flavor?

What About The Other Sauce Varieties?

As the names suggest, the Hot, Fire, and Diablo sauce varieties at Taco Bell are progressively spicier than the Mild sauce. 

The Hot sauce generally has a Scoville rating of around 2,500-3,000 units, while the Fire sauce ranges from 4,000-5,000 units. Diablo’s spiciest sauce on Taco Bell’s menu contains around 15,000-20,000 Scoville units. 

“I had a Taco Bell audition where I had to wear a huge sombrero and walk around like an idiot. I got call-backs for the movie ‘Twister,’ did small independent stuff that I won’t name. But it led to all my breakthrough moments on ‘Entourage.'”

– Mark Cuban, American Businessman

While these may not be as spicy as some artisanal hot sauces, they are still relatively hot for a fast-food chain.

However, it’s worth noting that individual heat tolerance can vary widely, so what one person considers “hot” may differ from another’s perception.

How Does Taco Bell’s Sauce Compare To Other Fast-Food Chains?

Taco Bell's Sauce

Compared to other fast-food chains, Taco Bell’s sauce can be considered relatively mild to moderate in terms of spiciness. 

For example, McDonald’s Spicy Buffalo sauce has been reported to contain around 200-300 Scoville units, making it milder than even Taco Bell’s Mild sauce. 

Similarly, Burger King’s Spicy Original Chicken Sandwich sauce is said to be around 300-500 Scoville units.

On the other hand, KFC’s Nashville Hot sauce is spicier, with a Scoville rating of around 2,000-4,000 units. 

While these comparisons can give a general idea of the relative spiciness of different chains’ sauces, it’s important to remember that individual heat tolerance can vary widely, so it’s always a good idea to start with a small amount of sauce and work your way up to your desired level of spiciness.

Tips Or Tricks For Balancing The Heat Level Of Taco Bell’s Sauce

  1. Pair spicier sauces with milder menu items to balance out the heat. For example, if you want to try the Fire sauce but are worried about it being too spicy, pair it with a milder menu item like the bean burrito or the quesadilla.
  2. Add some sour cream or guacamole to your dish to help cool down the heat. These toppings can neutralize some of the spiciness and add a creamy, cooling element.
  3. Ask for the sauce on the side and add it gradually to your dish. This can help you control the heat level and avoid overloading your dish with too much sauce.
  4. Order a drink with your meal to help cool down the heat. Soft drinks, iced tea, or even a cold glass of water can help to soothe your taste buds and reduce the spiciness.
  5. Consider ordering a menu item with a built-in cooling element, such as the cheesy roll-up or the 7-layer burrito. These items contain cheese, sour cream, and beans that can help balance the heat of spicier sauces.

FAQs

u003cstrongu003eWhat is the spiciest hot sauce at Taco Bell?u003c/strongu003e

The spiciest hot sauce at Taco Bell is the Diablo sauce, which contains around 15,000-20,000 Scoville units. 

u003cstrongu003eDoes Taco Bell sell hot sauce? u003c/strongu003e

Yes, Taco Bell does sell its hot sauce varieties in packets at its restaurants. Customers can usually find packets of the Mild, Hot, Fire, and Diablo sauces at the condiment station or by request at the counter. u003cbru003eu003cbru003eAdditionally, Taco Bell has made its hot sauce varieties available for purchase in stores and online, allowing fans to enjoy the flavors of Taco Bell at home.

In Conclusion 

While Taco Bell’s sauce may not be as spicy as some artisanal hot sauces, it still offers a range of flavorful options to add heat to your meal.

The Diablo sauce is the hottest variety on the menu, with a Scoville rating of around 15,000-20,000 units. 

However, individual heat tolerance can vary widely, so it’s always a good idea to start with a small amount of sauce and work your way up to your desired level of spiciness. 

References:

  1. https://www.allrecipes.com/article/what-are-banana-peppers/
  2. https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-12505344
Shari Mason

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