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What Kind of Oil & Vinegar Does Subway Use

What Kind of Oil & Vinegar Does Subway Use? Answered (2023)

Last Updated on December 31, 2022 by Shari Mason

Subway is often the first thing in mind when looking for something filling and fresh. Since you can customize your sandwiches and salads to your liking, you won’t regret this option.

When customing your sub sandwich or salad, there are lots of sauces, herbs, and salad dressings to choose from.  

But if you want something neutral and balanced, just oil and vinegar will do. While those are simple ingredients, how can they level up the taste of a plain subway sandwich?

What kind of oil and vinegar does Subway use? Let’s find out.

What Type of Oil & Vinegar Does Subway Use? 

bottles of oil and vinegar

In Subway sandwich shops, their oil is a mixture of canola oil and olive oil, while they use inexpensive red wine vinegar. 

When these oil and vinegar dressings are mixed, you can get a light and tangy dressing.

The red wine vinegar used by Subway for their sandwiches and salad dressing delivers a savory, tangy flavor compared to standard vinegar. 

This vinegar has a distinct flavor due to the fermentation process of red wine. It is commonly used in Mediterranean cooking and can be found in various sauces such as chimichurri.

“It’s fun to experiment. Start with two or three different vinegars, get to know them and expand it that way. Because cooking is about experimenting and playing with ingredients.”

— Kumar Mahadevan, Indian Chef/Restaurateur 

If you want to recreate the oil and vinegar combo at Subway to make your vinaigrettes at home, we suggest adding some salt, black pepper, roasted garlic, and basil to enhance the flavor.

This recipe will be a great dressing for your sandwich, vegetable salad, and wrap or bread.  

Two Kinds Of Oil They Use 

filling oil in a can

Canola Oil 

With an oil ratio of 90:10, the Subway fast food chain uses 90% Canola oil in their oil mixture. This is because canola is cheaper than olive oil. 

If Subway wants consistency across their various products, they’ll most likely rely on a milder oil blend such as canola oil as their base.

Besides, using canola oil [1] is cheaper to maintain flavor consistency across all Subway sandwich shops. 

Olive Oil 

Subway’s oil blend uses 10% olive oil. This is because olive oil is quite expensive [2]. This classic vegetable oil can impart a strong and unique taste, which may vary depending on the brand. 

Based on experts, Subway uses light olive oil as its more refined compared to other oil types.

But if you want to recreate their olive oil blend, we suggest using extra virgin olive oil for a stronger taste. 

Comparing Subway Oil With Other Oils 

Sunflower Oil

Sunflower oil is also a kind of vegetable oil that’s almost similar to canola. It is produced using sunflower seeds. Similar to canola, its light taste comes from the process of deodorization. 

If you’ll use sunflower oil, a 1:1 ratio is recommended. 

Avocado Oil

Avocado oil delivers a milder flavor, which can replace canola in a 1:1 ratio – be it a sandwich dressing or salad dressing. 

This kind of oil is recommended for cooking in high heat or for deep frying due to its high point of smoke.  

Peanut Oil

Peanut oil delivers a stronger flavor than canola. As one of the nut oils, it’s typically deodorized to reduce its strong flavor. 

But peanut oil is a great canola replacement. Use the same 1:1 ratio in all of your recipes.

Note: You can use other blended vegetable oil or any kind of oil to improve the sandwich or bread dressing’s flavors. 

Aside from the oils mentioned above, you can use garlic oil and soybean oil with an olive oil blend.  

What Kind of Vinegar Does Subway Use? 

Red wine vinegar that Subway uses for its oil and vinegar blend has a distinct flavor profile. 

No two vinegar can taste exactly similar, and there are some that you can use as substitutes for your recipes.

The red wine vinegar is one of the reasons why Subway’s dressing is popular among other stores. 

Aside from giving a subtly sweet yet tangy flavor to sandwiches or salads, it has antioxidants that are good for health.  

Comparing Subway Vinegar With Other Vinegar 

pouring vinegar on a glass

White Wine Vinegar

While white wine and red wine vinegar are made from fermenting wine in a dark place, they don’t have the same flavors. 

When you use white wine vinaigrette in the dishes, it offers a little more fruitiness and acidity. But it’s really hard to tell the difference between the two. 

So, white wine vinegar can be the best alternative to red wine vinegar, in the same ratio, when used in bread, sandwich, or making different dishes. 

Sherry Vinegar

Sherry vinegar is also made from fermenting wine, just like red wine vinegar. 

But, it lacks acidity, so if you use sherry vinaigrette on dishes, you’ll need more than when you use red wine vinegar. 

Balsamic Vinegar

Balsamic vinegar [3] is more popular than red wine vinegar. Unlike red wine vinegar, it is made from fermenting grape must, making it slightly acidic. 

Also, compared to red wine vinegar, balsamic is quite sweeter in flavor. We suggest cutting down the ratio in half if you opt to use this type of vinegar over red wine vinaigrette.  

FAQs

Why do people put oil and vinegar on Subway’s sub?

People put oil and vinegar blends on their Subway sub to enhance the flavors.

This oil blended with vinegar in a sandwich or salad gives a light yet rich tangy relish that most people crave in their Subway sub. 

What kind of red wine vinegar does Subway use?

Subway uses an inexpensive red wine vinegar with 5% acidity and sulfing agent.

This vinegar is one of the dressing options, along with Italian herbs, oils, Chipotle Southwest, and many more, that Subway offers customers. 

Final Verdict 

Now you know what kind of oil and vinegar Subway [4] use for their sandwich, wrap, and sub dressings. 

The consistent proportion of wine vinegar and olive oil blend tastes great together in a sandwich, salad, or a variety of dishes. 

This makes Subway attracts more customers due to the variety of mouth-watering dressing options and allows customers to customize their orders depending on their preferences.

References:

  1. https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/2015/04/13/ask-the-expert-concerns-about-canola-oil/ 
  2. https://www.realsimple.com/food-recipes/shopping-storing/food/high-quality-olive-oil 
  3. https://www.today.com/food/balsamic-vinegar-uses-how-incorporate-it-your-fall-recipes-t234764 
  4. https://www.subway.com/en-SG/AboutUs/History 
Shari Mason

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