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How Long Is Cooked Bacon Good For In Fridge

How Long Is Cooked Bacon Good For In Fridge? Resolved

Last Updated on February 16, 2024 by Shari Mason

Knowing how long you can keep cooked bacon safe in the fridge is crucial information for many households, given bacon’s status as a common kitchen staple.

Proper storage and handling of cooked bacon can prevent the growth of harmful bacteria and keep it fresh for longer. 

We will discuss how long cooked bacon can last in the fridge, how to store it properly, and signs that it might have gone bad. 

Whether you’re a bacon lover or an occasional consumer, this information will help you make informed decisions about your food storage and consumption.

How Long Does Cooked Bacon Last In The Fridge?

Bacon on a White Plate

Cooked bacon [1] can last in the refrigerator for up to 7 days. When stored properly in an airtight container or wrapped tightly in plastic or aluminum foil, cooked bacon can retain its freshness and quality for up to a week. 

It is essential to refrigerate cooked bacon as soon as possible after cooking, as letting it sit at room temperature for more than 2 hours can allow bacteria to grow rapidly.

It is also advisable to check the bacon regularly for any signs of spoilage, such as a change in color, texture, or odor.

If the bacon has any of these signs or has been in the refrigerator for more than seven days, it should be discarded to prevent the risk of foodborne illness.

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How Long Is Cooked Bacon Good For In The Freezer?

Cooked bacon can last in the freezer for up to 2 months.

To extend the shelf life of cooked bacon, it is best to wrap it tightly in plastic or aluminum foil and then place it in a freezer-safe airtight container. 

“I work out Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday; take Thursday off; then I work out Friday and Saturday. So sometimes I’ll eat whatever I want on Thursday, like a big breakfast of pancakes, bacon, eggs, and stuff. You can eat a big, hearty breakfast because you’re going to burn off most of it during the day anyway.”

– Mark Wahlberg, Actor

This will help to prevent freezer burn and maintain the quality and flavor of the bacon. When ready to use the bacon, thaw it in the refrigerator overnight or in the microwave.

It is important to note that while freezing can extend the shelf life of cooked bacon, it may change the texture and quality of the meat. 

Freezer burn and moisture loss can also occur if the bacon is not appropriately stored in the freezer. Therefore, it is best to consume the bacon within two months to ensure its best quality and taste.

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What To Do With Leftover Bacon

  1. Salad Toppings: Crumbled bacon can be added to various salads for extra flavor and texture.
  2. Sandwiches: Add bacon to your favorite sandwich for extra flavor.
  3. Pasta Dishes: Bacon can be added to pasta dishes, such as carbonara or mac and cheese, for extra richness and depth of flavor.
  4. Breakfast Dishes: Add chopped bacon to scrambled eggs, frittatas [2], or breakfast burritos.
  5. Snacks: Bacon can be enjoyed on its own as a snack or as a topping for crackers or cheese.
  6. Soup: Bacon can be added to soup, such as potato soup or chowder, for extra flavor and richness.
  7. Dips: For extra flavor and texture, bacon can be added to dips, such as ranch or cheese dip.

How To Tell If It Is Bad

cooking bacon on a pan
  1. Change in color: Cooked bacon that has gone bad will often turn a shade of green or gray, indicating the growth of bacteria.
  2. Odd odor: If the bacon has a rancid, sour, or off smell, it is likely that it has gone bad and should be discarded.
  3. Slimy texture: If the bacon feels slimy or sticky to the touch, bacteria have likely grown on it, and it should be discarded.
  4. Mold growth: If there is visible mold growing on the bacon, it should be discarded immediately.
  5. Change in taste: If the bacon has a metallic, bitter, or sour taste, it has likely gone bad and should be discarded.

Tips On How To Store Cooked Bacon

  1. Cool quickly: After cooking, let the bacon cool to room temperature before refrigerating or freezing.
  2. Wrap tightly: Wrap the bacon tightly in plastic wrap or aluminum foil, or place it in an airtight container to prevent air from entering.
  3. Refrigerate promptly: Refrigerate the cooked bacon as soon as possible, within 2 hours of cooking, to prevent bacteria from growing.
  4. Label and date: Label the bacon with the date it was cooked and the date it should be discarded to help keep track of its freshness.
  5. Store in the right place: Store the cooked bacon in the coldest part of the refrigerator, typically the meat compartment or the bottom shelf, to ensure it stays fresh.

FAQs

u003cstrongu003eCan you eat cooked bacon after seven days?u003c/strongu003e

Eating cooked bacon after seven days is not recommended as it may have lost its quality and freshness, and there may be a risk of foodborne illness.

u003cstrongu003eHow long is bacon good for after opening?u003c/strongu003e

Whether raw or cooked, bacon is typically good for 7-10 days after opening if it is appropriately stored in the refrigerator. Raw bacon should be cooked or frozen within this time to ensure freshness and prevent foodborne illness risks. 

u003cstrongu003eDoes cook bacon need to be refrigerated overnight?u003c/strongu003e

Yes, cooked bacon should be refrigerated overnight or within 2 hours of cooking to prevent the growth of harmful bacteria. The refrigerator’s temperature should be below 40°F to ensure that any bacteria present will not grow and multiply. 

Final Thoughts

Cooked bacon should be stored in the refrigerator and used within seven days of cooking to ensure its freshness and safety. Proper storage is essential to prevent harmful bacteria’s growth and extend its shelf life. 

To store cooked bacon, wrap it tightly in plastic or aluminum foil or place it in an airtight container. Label it with the date it was cooked and the date it should be discarded. 

If you notice any signs of spoilage, such as a change in color, texture, or odor, it is best to discard the bacon to prevent the risk of foodborne illness. 

References:

  1. https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/articles/50-things-to-make-with-bacon
  2. https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/collection/fritatta-recipes
Shari Mason

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