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Can You Use Metal Utensils On Le Creuset

Can You Use Metal Utensils On Le Creuset Cookware? Solved

Last Updated on June 15, 2024 by Shari Mason

Le Creuset, a famous name in cookware, stands out for its top-notch enameled cast iron pieces. These items are praised for being super **durable**, spreading heat evenly, and working great for many cooking jobs.

However, one question that often arises when using Le Creuset cookware is whether or not it is safe to use metal utensils on the surface. 

We will explore the answer to this question and provide tips for using metal utensils on Le Creuset cookware.

Is It Safe To Use Metal Utensils On Le Creuset Cookware?

Le Creuset Dutch Oven and Braiser

While using metal utensils on Le Creuset cookware is alright, we do not recommend it as metal utensils can cause scratches and chips to the enamel. The enamel surface [1] is hard but not completely scratch resistant. 

It is best to use wooden, plastic, or silicone utensils when cooking with Le Creuset cookware to preserve the integrity of the enamel and ensure the longevity of your cookware. 

If you must use metal utensils, opt for a smooth and non-abrasive surface, such as stainless steel utensils and be gentle with them when using on the cookware.

Read:

Will Using Metal Utensils Damage The Enamel?

Yes. Using metal utensils on Le Creuset cookware can cause scratches and chips to the enamel. These scratches and chips can weaken the enamel over time and make it more susceptible to damage. 

It can also affect the overall performance and lifespan of the cookware. The enamel coating on Le Creuset cookware is designed to be hard and durable, but it is not totally scratch-resistant. 

Read:

Are Any Specific Types Of Metal Utensils Safe To Use On Le Creuset Cookware?

We recommend using wooden, plastic, or silicone [2] utensils when cooking with Le Creuset cookware. Opt for utensils that have a smooth and non-abrasive surface, such as stainless steel utensils. 

“An excellent man, like precious metal, is in every way invariable; A villain, like the beams of a balance, is always varying, upwards and downwards.”

– John Locke, English Philosopher

These utensils are less likely to cause scratches and chips to the enamel. Avoid using utensils with sharp or serrated edges, as these can cause more damage to the enamel. 

It is also important to note that while stainless steel utensils are less likely to cause damage to the enamel, they can still scratch it over time if used excessively. 

Tips On Using Utensils On Le Creuset Cookware

Le Creuset Signature 31cm Oval Dutch Oven
  1. Be gentle when using metal utensils on the surface of the cookware. Avoid scraping or dragging the utensils across the surface of the cookware.
  2. Avoid using metal utensils on cookware recently removed from the stove or oven, as the enamel may be more susceptible to damage when it is hot.
  3. Always use metal utensils with care, and avoid using them excessively.
  4. Clean the cookware and utensils after each use to remove any food particles that could cause scratches or chips to the enamel.

FAQs

u003cstrongu003eWhat can you not use in Le Creuset?u003c/strongu003e

Using metals, abrasive cleaning pads, and high heat are some things to avoid when using Le Creuset.

u003cstrongu003eCan you use a metal whisk on le Creuset?u003c/strongu003e

A metal whisk on Le Creuset cookware is not recommended as it can scratch the enamel surface. Using a heat-resistant rubber, silicone whisk, or a wooden spoon is best to avoid damaging the cookware.

Final Thoughts

It is not recommended to use metal utensils on Le Creuset cookware as they can scratch the enamel surface, which can cause damage to the cookware over time.

Instead, it is best to use wooden, plastic, or silicone utensils to avoid damaging the cookware. 

It is also important to avoid acidic foods, sudden temperature changes, high-heat cooking, and dry food cooking in enameled cast iron cookware to preserve the pot’s longevity. 

References:

  1. https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/engineering/enamel-surface
  2. https://www.britannica.com/science/silicone
Shari Mason

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